Scatter the Sky…Amy Lowell, Fictional Colors, Morning Mist

  “scatter the sky with my blazing heart” © 2019, Molly Larson Cook 18″ x 24″   Acrylic and ink Available You already know how much I love color – that animal that wags its own tail.  My color chart is always handy and my paint box goes well beyond red, yellow and blue although I enjoy mixing my own colors from those and a few … Continue reading Scatter the Sky…Amy Lowell, Fictional Colors, Morning Mist

Art, Chopin, Mazurkas, and Your One Wild and Precious Life

    “Your one wild and precious life” ©2019, Molly Larson Cook 18″ x 24″, Acrylic and ink on canvas Available   When my old friends whom I’ve never met, David Bayles and Ted Orland write about finding your work in their Art & Fear, they raise the spirit of Chopin to talk about useful forms on which to hang our art aprons or berets.  … Continue reading Art, Chopin, Mazurkas, and Your One Wild and Precious Life

Painting, Papa and Waltzing

  “My Papa’s Waltz” ©2019, Molly Larson Cook Acrylic on canvas, 24″ x 30″ Available When someone once said that “A picture is worth a thousand words,” a pundit quickly countered with this challenge:  “If that’s true, paint the Gettysburg address.” As an abstract expressionist painter who loves color, I don’t begin my work with a particular idea in mind.  I begin with what in … Continue reading Painting, Papa and Waltzing

The Questions That Matter

“when I heard the learn’d astronomer…” © 2019, Molly Larson Cook Acrylic on canvas, 24″ x 30″ available In that much-quoted book Art & Fear, David Bayles and Ted Orland suggest that perhaps there’s a simple premise when it comes to understanding our lives as artists and our work:  just pull together all the leads and pieces and we’ll discover a “single, clear, concise, fundamental, … Continue reading The Questions That Matter

Joan Mitchell – Poetry, Jazz, Abstract Expressionism

My latest so far untitled work in progress (with miles to go before I sleep!) I was reading an article for dancers recently about “taking class” at home.  In the dance and acting worlds, “taking class” is a given.  You never stop taking class – learning, practicing, working on the moves or the lines or any of the countless details of your craft.  And it … Continue reading Joan Mitchell – Poetry, Jazz, Abstract Expressionism

Playing Small May Be for Some People, But Not for the Artists of the World

“Know you could tumble any second…” ©2019, Molly Larson Cook Acrylic on canvas, 24″ x 30″ Several years ago a nonartist friend held a business seminar in a classroom at the art school in my city.  When I arrived, she was busy “saging” the room.  I asked why and she said, “Because they do art critiques here and there’s so much bad energy.” I suggested that she … Continue reading Playing Small May Be for Some People, But Not for the Artists of the World

The Art of Imperfection

What is commonly called ugliness in nature can in art become full of beauty. –August Rodin It was the father of a young boy at a Rodin show at the National Gallery and my grandmother, the consummate gardener who taught me the truth of Rodin’s statement. I was visiting the Rodin show at the National Gallery several years ago, following along behind a man and … Continue reading The Art of Imperfection

The Spirit of the Work

  “…whose woods these are I think I know…” Acrylic on canvas 20 X 24 ©2019, Molly Larson Cook (Poetry and painting) I thought it was perhaps because I’m so relatively new in the art world.  Or maybe I was overthinking the work and my art brain was rebelling.  Or maybe my quirks were taking over and nobody but me had this oddly vague idea … Continue reading The Spirit of the Work

Home, Sweet Studio

“Light breaks where no light shines…” Acrylic on canvas 24 x 30 ©Molly Larson Cook 2019 For an artist, a relocation upsets more than an apple cart.  It’s not just a matter of packing the paints and the canvases, sorting through old brushes and making a lot of decisions about what to keep and what to throw away.  It’s also a matter of adjusting to … Continue reading Home, Sweet Studio

Art Problems and Ordinary Problems – They’re Not the Same

In their fine book, Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, David Bayles and Ted Orland make a distinction between art problems – which are unique – and ordinary problems – which are, well, ordinary. Their point here is that ordinary problems may be ordinary but they are in no way trivial. Ordinary problems are the ones that consume too much … Continue reading Art Problems and Ordinary Problems – They’re Not the Same